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Page last edited by Jessica Chapman and Lawrence Toomey on 20 January 2016.

Some updates have been made to consider: 

  • What do we need licences for;
  • What are our broad requirements for licences; and
  • Initial recommendations for specific licences

Amazon team: Please review and add comments in the comments box at bottom of page. This is still definitely for further discussion!

What do we need licences for?

Note: For now this exclude licences that may be needed if we use Docker. This will be considered later as needed.

1: Amazon Machine Images (AMI)

An AMI (Amazon Machine Image) is an end-product of our work. The AMI can be imported and run by a user, and exported to other regions/accounts, under the umbrella of Amazon's 'end-user licence agreement'. Our understanding is that AMIs are only directly transferable to other Amazon Cloud resources.

Example Use cases:

A European user replicates the VM in their own country using Amazon.

2. CSIRO Virtual Machine Images

For licence purposes we consider four components:

2a) The VM 'as a whole' - i.e. the VM as the 'wrapper' or 'skin' that wraps around the contents but is not the contents itself.

2b) The VM Operating System. We are currently using CentOS.

2c) Software (source code and executables) developed in CSIRO

2d) Software (source code and executables) developed elsewhere.

Software comprises all the linux tools, plus the pulsar data analysis packages, and any scripts and pipelines that we create.Software include executables where relevant.

Use cases

a) provide users with acces to the 'basic' VM and all its contents. The user transfer the VM to another location - could be cross-cloud (i.e. China) or cross-domain (such as Bragg or Pawsey).

b) as above but also provide access to additional content such as scripts or additional software dynamically loaded from a Bitbucket (or similar)

c) provide users with access to the VM< and its content through publishing in the DAP

What are our project requirements for licences?

  • All CSIRO Software: Basically OpenSource conditions. Permission to use all packages provided (source code and executables) without fees - including modifications to code etc
  • All CSIRO Software - team members: are there any specific restrictions we wish to impose?
  • CSIRO VM Images - provided without any guarantees, warranties, expectation of support, etc.  Ok to modify the contents and to distribute further. Modified version should be distributed under conditions.
  • Non-CSIRO licences - provided as is (see table below)
  • Non-CSIRO code without licences - ensure that these can be made openly available

Generally - as far as possible aim to have the minimum number of licence types per release.

A few discussion points:

  1. Has anyone else in CSIRO established licence requirements for VM. If so lets learn from their experience!
  2. Non-CSIRO software without licences - how do we establish licences - do we 'have a right' to establish a licence for code we don't own. What is the process for this?

Amazon Project: Software

CSIRO software

The following table includes all CSIRO software in the CPU-based VM instance 'pulsarVMEC2'. The GPU-based instance is not yet included.

PackageCurrent LicenceOwners/developers

Is software

still required (Y/N)

Other notes

 

PSRCAT v1.53No licence in source codeRNManchester, GHY 
ptaSimulate 1.0No licence in source codeGHY 
Custom scriptsNo licence in source codeLT, CW, other?Discuss requirements


Non-CSIRO software

The following table includes all non-CSIRO software in the CPU-based VM instance 'pulsarVMEC2'. The GPU-based instance is not yet included.

PackageCurrent LicenceOwners/developers

Is software

still required (Y/N)

Other notes
CFITSIO 3.370Copyright (Unpublished--all rights reserved under the copyright laws of the United States), U.S. Government as represented by the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.  No copyright is claimed in the United States under Title 17, U.S. CodeNASAYPermission to freely use, copy, modify, and distribute this software and its documentation without fee is hereby granted, provided that this copyright notice and disclaimer of warranty appears in all copies
DSPSR 2Academic Free License v2.1Van Straten et. alY 
FFTW 3.3.4GNU General Public LicenseMITY 
FV 5.3

Copyright (Unpublished--all rights reserved under the copyright laws of
the United States), U.S. Government as represented by the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.  No copyright is claimed in the United States under Title 17, U.S. Code

NASAYPermission to freely use, copy, modify, and distribute this software and its documentation without fee is hereby granted, provided that this copyright notice and disclaimer of warranty appears in all copies.
mpi4py 1.3.1LICENSE: MPI for Python

:Author:       Lisandro Dalcin
:Contact:      dalcinl@gmail.com
:Web Site:     http://mpi4py.googlecode.com/
:Organization: CIMEC <http://www.cimec.org.ar>
:Address:      CCT CONICET, 3000 Santa Fe, Argentina

Copyright (c) 2013, Lisandro Dalcin.
All rights reserved.
Lisandro DalcinY 
TempoNestGNU General Public License v3.0Lindley LentatiY 
MultiNesthttp://www.mrao.cam.ac.uk/~ff235/MultiNest_License.pdfFarhan Feroz & Mike HobsonY 
PGPLOT 5.2.2PGPLOT Fortran Graphics Subroutine Library                       
     Version 5.2.2  
  Copyright (c) 1983-2001 by the California Institute of Technology. 
   All rights reserved.                                               
                                                                      
   For further information, contact:                                  
      Dr. T. J. Pearson                                               
      105-24 California Institute of Technology,                      
      Pasadena, California 91125, USA                                 
                                                                      
      tjp@astro.caltech.edu                                           
                                                                      
  The PGPLOT library, both binary and source, and the PGPLOT manual   
  `PGPLOT Graphics Subroutine Library' are copyrighted, but available 
  without fee for education, academic research and non-commercial     
  purposes. Ownership of the software remains with the California     
  Institute of Technology.  Users may distribute the binary and       
  source code to third parties provided that the copyright notice and 
  this statement appears on all copies and that no charge is made for 
  such copies.  Any entity wishing to integrate all or part of the    
  source code into a product for commercial use or resale should      
  contact the author at the above address.                            
                                                                      
  THE CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS     
  ABOUT THE SUITABILITY OF THE SOFTWARE FOR ANY PURPOSE.  IT IS       
  PROVIDED `AS IS' WITHOUT EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY.  THE          
  CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY      
  DAMAGES SUFFERED BY THE USER OF THIS SOFTWARE.                      
                                                                      
  The software may have been developed under agreements between the   
  California Institute of Technology and the Federal Government which 
  entitle the Government to certain rights.
T. J. PearsonY 
PRESTO v2GNU General Public LicenseScott RansomY 
PSRCHIVE 2012-12+Academic Free License v2.1Van Straten et. alY 
PyFITS 3.3Copyright (C) 2015 Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA)

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:
    1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
       notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

    2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above
       copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following
       disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided
       with the distribution.

    3. The name of AURA and its representatives may not be used to
       endorse or promote products derived from this software without
       specific prior written permission.
AURAY 
SIGPROC-mjkGNU General Public LicenseMike KeithYNote: Replace SIGPROC4.3
TEMPO 13.000GNU General Public License v2.0Multiple authorsY 
TEMPO2 2014.11.1GNU General Public License v2.0Multiple authorsY 
TopCat 4.3GNU General Public LicenseM. B. TaylorY 

 

 

 

Open (Source) Software Licensing and the DAP

The Open Source Software (OSS) process can be used to navigate the software licensing maze.

The available OSS CSIRO Licence Deeds for DAP can be found here:

The DAP makes use of six types of licences as shown here. Software in the DAP is generally made available under the three items shown in bold.


 LinkFull titleNotes 
1Creative Commons BY

Creative Commons (CC) Attribution 4.0 International

(CC BY 4.0)

Very open licence

Permission to freely use without fee, including commercially.  No copyright claimed in United States.

JD advises:

There are a couple (of licences) under CC-BY, but that is generally regarded as not ideal for software. 

 
2CC BY-SA

Creative Commons (CC) Attribution-Share Alike  4.0 International

(CC BY-SA 4.0)

Modifications to original must be shared with same licence as original

 
3CC BY-NC-ND

CC Attribution Non-Commercial-NoDerivatives

More restricted

 
4CSIRO Binary Software Licence Agreement

CSIRO Binary software licence agreement

Executable code

Quite restricted (e.g. access one copy only)

Can't use this if GPL is included.

 
5

CSIRO Open Source Software Licence

(based on MIT/BSD)

CSIRO Open Source Software Licence v1.0

Cover source code and binary provided as is. No warranties etc.

Note that this is more permissive than GPL.

This is incompatible with GPL

 
6GPLv3 Licence with CSIRO Disclaimer

GPLv3 Licence with CSIRO Disclaimer

Also provided as is. Looks similar to 5.

 

Examples: WorkSpace comes under item 4, see http://doi.org/10.4225/08/56CD88EDBE722

See http://doi.org/10.4225/08/569D9DB1306AD as a simple example

Some useful documents

 

  
VMPA_Software_Description_2015-09-17.docVirtual Machine for Pulsar Astronomy (VMPA) software description
VMPA_Software_IP_Licensing_2015-09-17.xlsxFiner-grained description including licensing is available as a spreadsheet here:
http://mirror.centos.org/centos/5/os/i386/EULACentos End User Licence Agreement
https://www.centos.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=10142More on CentOS (see also David's notes below)

 

Preliminary Licence Recommendations

RefLicence forRecommended Licence Type(s)Notes
1Amazon Machine ImageAmazon end-user licenceStraightforward
2aCSIRO VM as a meta structure or 'wrapper'To be established. This is not yet clear.

John Zic will follow up to seek advice on copyright and/or licence requirements for this.

 

2bCSIRO VM Operating System (CentOS)

GPL (check version)

 

See: https://www.centos.org/legal/

https://www.centos.org/legal/trademarks/

Freely available other than to a list of prohibited countries.

Usage guidelines are provided.The Guidelines and 'Model trademark Guidelines are themselves licenced under the CC Attribution 3.0 unported licence.

if OS is modified by us then should not be distributed as 'CentOS' (i.e. call it something else)

CentOS-5 comes with no guarantees or warranties of any sorts,

either written or implied.

The Distribution is released as GPL. Individual packages in the

distribution come with their own licences.

2cCSIRO (pulsar related) scripts, software source code and executablesCSIRO Open Source Software Licence v1.0 (based on MIT/BSD)(Used by Arch and in use in DAP)
2dNon-CSIRO software source code and executables

See above table for existing licences

 
    

Next steps (as at 25 Feb 2016)

Lawrence will set up appropriate licence statements for CSIRO software.

Jessica will focus on making sure licence arrangements for individual software packages (CSIRO and external) are clear. (done)

John will consult with others (for example individuals from Data 61, Brendan Speet, ASC) to try to reach clarity on licence for the VM as 'meta' structure.

 

 

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15 Comments

  1. DB: Update after conversations with Lawrence Toomey and Sue Cook (mid-October)

    Lawrence and I spoke about the Tier 2 Creative Commons licence mentioned above for the OS (Centos) used in the VM and that this may not actually be correct.

    My initial thinking after talking with Lawrence and Sue was that the CSIRO Binary Software Licence is the licence of best fit (at least of those available in DAP) that makes sense in this context. There is a supplemental licence provision for other licences used by us. The same is true for the two open source licences available in DAP.

    However, after working through the Licence Chooser at Software Release Process Home, and reaching Binary Software - Self Help Form, it seems to me that we may need to use a GPL licence (with CSIRO disclaimer) as can be selected via DAP, since it seems clear that the VM will contain GPL components, even though the VM itself is not source code.


    As far as I am aware, we do not as yet have any VM collections in DAP, so there's no precedent, nothing with which to compare. What we do here may guide what others do in future.

    Sue suggested that if CASS has a legal / business development / IP staff member, we should consult him/her. She also suggested that David Hill (CHECK name, location with Sue) in legal may be able to help.

    It seems that a broader discussion is needed. I was initially going to have a call with Sue, Lawrence and I. Jessica today (Oct 23) suggested a call with Cynthia. Perhaps a call with Sue, Cynthia, Lawrence, and myself?

  2. I have a number of comments that I will post separately, to make them easier to reply/refer to. Here's the first.

    Amazon Machine Images (AMI)

    • Brendan Speet may be able to provide advice on this and possibly some of the next section, as you've noted above.

  3. Preliminary Licence Recommendations

    The first of these (End User Licence Agreement) simply says: 

    CentOS-5 EULA

    CentOS-5 comes with no guarantees or warranties of any sorts,
    either written or implied.

    The Distribution is released as GPL. Individual packages in the
    distribution come with their own licences.

      • So, I think the answer to which licence should be used for CentOS itself is: GPL.
      • We'll have to look at which version, but 2 appears to be likely. If so, may be able to use GPL 3 if publishing VM in DAP since from http://www.gnu.org/licenses/license-list.en.html we have: "GPLv3 is not compatible with GPLv2 by itself. However, most software released under GPLv2 allows you to use the terms of later versions of the GPL as well."
      • The part that says "individual packages in the distribution come with their own licences" seems relevant to 2a. The question is whether the CentOS licence can be mixed with licences that are not compatible with GPL for the purposes of 2a as part of the 2a "meta structure" (again, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/license-list.en.html) by which I assume you mean, CentOS plus all our other pipeline scripts and programs.
        • There are many GPL licensed tools in the Amazon Project Software table above. There are also some that are not, such as the Academic Free Licence.

  4. 2c CSIRO (pulsar related) scripts, software source code and executables

  5. Open (Source) Software Licensing and the DAP

    • GPLv3 Licence with CSIRO Disclaimer
      • I'm sure you all know this, but it's important to note that the MIT/BSD licence is quite permissive while GPL is not. 
  6. 2. CSIRO Virtual Machine Images

    Example use cases

    DAP?

  7. For any software that has a licence that is incompatible with GPL, such as DSPSR2, can it either be:

    • Dual-licensed (or is it already)?
    • Replaced?
    • Pulled in dynamically from a repository (git or otherwise), as Chen has mentioned doing during at least one scrum I can recall.

     

  8. Preliminary Licence Recommendations

    • Comment was getting too long, so splitting this out:
      • Although CentOS is not RedHat (although there is a relationship), the following from http://www.redhat.com/f/pdf/corp/trademark1.pdf may also be a useful elaboration of the CentOS EULA:

        As a licensee under the GPL and other applicable licenses, you have the right to make changes to Red Hat® Linux® software and can market and distribute those changes according to the terms of the license. Those changes may include making modifications to certain portions of the software, adding new components that were not included by Red Hat, or removing components that were included by Red Hat. However, you may not call or brand your resulting product “Red Hat”, or use any Red Hat trademarks on your product or in any related advertising in any way. Once you have made changes to the software, it is no longer the same as the original, and as a result, it is inappropriate to name it or brand it as though it is.

        ...

        As a licensee under the GPL and other applicable licenses, you may make modifications to the software contained in Red Hat® Linux® or Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® and may market the revised product in accordance with the terms of the licenses.

     

  9. Thanks for all the helpful comments David. Will discuss further in Scrum tomorrow.

  10. I have created a text file 'OSS_LICENCE.txt' that contains the 'CSIRO Open Source Software Licence v1.0'. This file can be installed in the top directory of any of the CSIRO-only code not containing GPL licenses, that we produce for the Amazon Project.

    Please find it attached below:

    OSS_LICENCE.txt

    I have also created a text file 'GPL_LICENCE.txt' that contains the 'GPL3 License with CSIRO disclaimer'. This file can be installed in the top directory of any of the CSIRO-only code containing GPL licenses, that we produce for the Amazon Project.

    Please find it attached below:

    GPL_LICENCE.txt

  11. Discussed with Lawrence the lack of CR characters that made the licence files hard to view on Windows (in Notepad) and the presence of byte order marks in the OSS licence file.

    The following files seem to be fine on Windows (Notepad and in bash: less, vi). Lawrence, can you please check under Linux?

    GPL_LICENCE-crlf.txt

    OSS_LICENCE-crlf-nobom.txt

  12. Hi David,

    Tested on Linux and Mac OSX - all ok - well done!!

  13. Update - Applying licences to code in GH's VM (pulsarVMEC2-P595) for the fold-mode paper:

    SoftwareLicenceApplied
    psrcatGPL_LICENCE.txty
    dr2 pipeline Apache License, Version 2.0y
    RM softwareOSS_LICENCE.txty
    misc scriptsOSS_LICENCE.txty
       

     

     

  14. Discussions with David Lau - considering the viral nature of GPL license, an alternative is to approach the authors of code/libraries to issue a different, specialised license (eg. BSD or preferably Academic Free style) for GPL affected libraries and code:

    • FFTW 3.3.4
    • TempoNest
    • PRESTO v2
    • SIGPROC-mjk
    • TEMPO and TEMPO2
    • TopCat 4.3
    • psrcat

    This may be the real alternative - but requires a community response and belief in the need to change code and licensing. Specifically there needs to be a shared vision of being able to distribute a VM with the complete "experimental workbench" that is required to have others validate claims by being able to reproduce the results.