Page tree

This site is now obsolete. Please see Cyber Physical Systems

Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

  • Page:
    1996-2006 Dragline Automation The Mining Automation team at QCAT has been developing high-technology systems to assist dragline operators and mine planners since 1994. We have demonstrated our cruise control and Digital Terrain Mapping (DTM) technologies in operation on a scale model dragline in Brisbane, allowing the machine to be operated by a team member in the USA.
  • Page:
    1999-2004 Load Haul Dump (LHD) Automation An LHD is a mid sized (up to 60 tonne) underground mining vehicle that loads, hauls and dumps (hence its name) metaliferous ore from an open stope (where there is broken rock) to a crusher or waiting truck to be transported to the surface. Since the roof of the tunnel in open stope areas is unstable, this type of operation presents a number of safety issues and provides a perfect opportunity for automation. Our aim in this project was to automate the haulage and dumping cycle for an LHD.
  • Page:
    2000-2003 Haul Truck Volume Estimation CSIRO has developed a system called Trayscan to measure the in-situ volume of material contained within the tray of moving haul trucks. Such information is critical to truck utilization and can lead to significant gains in productivity. The system consists of a field computer and two proximity lasers. The lasers are placed high above the roadway to enable them to scan each truck as it passes underneath. 
  • Page:
    2000-2007 Blast Hole Charging Automation The aim of this project was to automate the charging process in underground mining. This process involves placing primer and detonators into holes drilled into the roof and walls of development drives, and filling the holes with liquid explosives. The vehicle to be automated (referred to as the Mobile Charging Unit) carries an emulsion pumping system, a primer/detonator assembly system and a hydraulic arm. CSIRO's role in the project was to develop a hydraulic arm that is able to insert the emulsion hose into the pre-drilled holes.
  • Page:
    2004-2009 Hot Metal Carrier Automation
    We've created an autonomous hot metal carrier that is capable of conducting all the operations of a manned vehicle, as well as being able to monitor and manage its own hardware and software, and respond intelligently in the event of any issues or problems it may face. And since 2005 we've had a prototype working for many continuous hours across a range of conditions and environments at our industrial laboratory in Brisbane.
  • Page:
    2004-2009 Shovel Loading Automation With funding from the Australian coal industry's research program ACARP, CSIRO is collaborating with the Cooperative Research Centre for Mining, to develop automated swing loading technology for electric mining shovels. Our contribution to this project is the development of a system which takes input from a variety of sensors (including lasers and a mm wave radar) and uses this to construct and maintain an accurate model of the shovel's environment capturing the shape and form of the face, the position and location of the crusher-conveyor or truck and the shovel itself.
  • Page:
    2005-2006 Excavator Guidance This project developed and demonstrated a system that is able to simultaneously track the bucket of a mining excavator and map the terrain under the boom. Trials of a proof of concept system deployed on an excavator at the Blair Athol mine in central Queensland demonstrated that the system is able to generate dynamic Digital Terrain Maps (DTM) while tracking the location of the bucket teeth to within 10cm. Importantly, the trials also demonstrated that the sensors are able to survive over extended periods in the mining environment.

     

  • Page:
    2007-2008 Rock-Breaker Automation Together with colleagues from across the ICT Centre as well as CSIRO's Division of Exploration and Mining, researchers from the Autonomous Systems Laboratory have developed technologies that will enable the effective and safe telerobotic control of mining equipment over distances of thousands of kilometers. Our technology has been proven on a Rockbreaker machine at Rio Tinto's West Angeles iron ore mine, which was controlled by an operator over 1,000 km away in Perth.
  • Page:
    2013-2015 AU2EU The Authentication and Authorisation for Entrusted Unions (AU2EU) project is a two year EU funded research and development project that is investigating secure, trustworthy collaboration infrastructure allowing real-time information exchange and interaction for collaborating organisations, while preserving confidentiality and privacy. Total value of the project is  8.4M (AUD11.84M).
  • Page:
    2016 Mine Informatics The CSIRO Mine Informatics project is working with the Mining Industry to address productivity improvements by the application of intelligent informatics methods. The main activities are: mapping and characterising major voids in underground mines using remotely operated flying vehicles, and virtual modelling of mining and mineral processing operations, enabling automation of the discovery of opportunities for improving efficiency through the application of machine learning techniques.
  • Page:
    Cow Tracking Wireless sensor networks can provide farmers with real-time measurements of parameters such as soil moisture, crop health, and animal movement. This data will help inform practices for sustainable agriculture and help farmers to more accurately and effectively control activities such as irrigation, planting, stock movement, and pesticide application. Networks of nodes with both sensors and actuators will eventually not only monitor the agricultural environment but also control it intelligently.
  • Page:
    Energy Efficient Buildings Employees of large organizations like CSIRO could be forgiven for thinking that anything they might do in their office to save energy won’t make much difference – after all, they don’t see the company’s electricity bill, let alone how they’re contributing to it. We developed a system that reduces energy usage of HVAC, lighting, and electric appliances using inputs from pervasive wireless sensors and human experience modules. The system’s architecture promotes information sharing between HVAC and appliances subsystems, uses sensors both to optimize system settings and to validate energy savings and comfort levels of individual employees, and provides feedback to employees on their individual performance. We have built and deployed 25 personal climate sensors and 30 personal appliances meters in 15 offices on our campus over a period of one year.
  • Page:
    Flying Fox Tracking A key motivating application for long term tracking is to understand the behaviour of migratory birds. In particular, flying foxes are major cause for disease spread in both Australia and in Southeast Asia. These animals are highly mobile, traveling tens of kilometres in a single night and covering distances in excess of 1000 km with the migratory season. In Australia, flying foxes are responsible for the spread of the Hendra virus, which is lethal to horses and harmful to humans. the processes and dynamics that underpin disease propagation within a group of flying foxes are not well understood, which is the main driver to monitor their movements. CSIRO ICT and ecology researchers are working together on developing a new generation of energy-efficient ICT technologies that can continuously track the position of flying foxes, by incorporating expert knowledge on their movement patterns. 
  • Page:
    Fruit Fly Traps Together with entomologists from CSIRO Agriculture we are developing a new generation of low-cost, low-maintenance fruit fly traps that can automatically and reliably detect the capture of a fruit fly, collect photographic evidence, and use wireless communications to notify relevant authorities of the detection. The new technology will permit far more timely notification of an outbreak, and with large-scale uptake has the potential to be more cost effective than the current manual inspection regime.
  • Page:
    Intelligent Phenotyping (iPhen) A phenotype refers to an individual's observable traits whereas genotype refers to the genetic make up of an individual. In livestock, aquaculture, and plant industry sensors are being widely used to measure different phenotypes. For example, sensors are used to measure heart rates in oysters, to measure flow of water through plants, and behaviour patterns in cattle. These sensors generate a big volume of time series data and demands automated analysis for exhaustive and meaningful analysis of the underlying problem.
  • Page:
    Listening for Frogs Frog populations are often used as a bioindicator of the health of waterway ecosystems, providing valuable information to water resource managers. With the support of Seqwater, CSIRO researchers are working to develop networks of acoustic sensors that can recognise, record, and ultimately classify frog vocalisations.
  • Page:
    Monitoring Rainforest Regeneration A network of wireless sensor nodes in Queensland's Springbrook National Park is being used to monitor the recovery of the regenerating rainforest from previous agricultural grassland. Nodes are located in areas of open grassland, regenerating rainforest and old rainforest, where they monitor micro-climate indicators including temperature, humidity, leaf wetness, soil moisture, wind speed and wind direction. The sensor network provides a valuable research platform for the study of land-use change, the effects of invasive species on biodiversity, the ecological functioning of rainforests and the impacts of climate change
  • Page:
    Online Education We've joined forces with science education experts from 3P Learning to develop ‘immersive learning’ environments which allow students to explore locations from their home or classroom. We used Zebedee to recreate and 3D mesh of the Jenolan Cave System in NSW. This 3D Mesh was used as the basis of the Australias Biggest School Excursion. For more information Read more ...  
  • Page:
    Phenocopter This 2 year CSIRO internally funded project developed an integrated image capturing package and a common workflow that guides researchers to acquire and process ground level and low-altitude aerial images of vegetation and derive or predict key variables associated with biophysical and count statistics. The project was a collaborative effort between the former CSIRO ICT Centre and CSIRO's former Plant Industry division The Autonomous Systems Program focused on the development of avionics including the sensor payload for an unmanned helicopter - the Phenocopter.

     

  • Page:
    Smart Skies

    CSIRO is developing autonomous helicopters and the technologies that support their safe, reliable and cost effective operation through our collaboration with Queensland University of Technology's Australian Research Centre for Aerospace Automation (ARCAA).

  • Page:
    Stealth Tracking dynamic targets without being detected requires not only visual but also acoustic stealth. Whilst visual covertness has been explored to varying degrees for many years, robotic acoustic stealth is still sparsely studied. Our goal is to significantly extend both these concepts by uniquely combining visual and acoustic stealth to maintain continuous line-of-sight observation to a moving natural object of interest, such as wild animals, in outdoor environments without being detected.
  • Page:
    Water Quality Monitoring The fresh water system is a complex dynamic system comprising catchment areas, aquifers, rivers, lakes and recycled water. Wireless sensor networks offer a tool for integrated monitoring of all aspects of the water system, thus providing water resource managers with the information they need to secure high-quality drinking water which is vital for healthy living. We are developing and field-testing new sensor nodes and networking technologies that will enable versatile, scalable, and robust sensor networks for water management applications.

  • No labels